Month: June 2012

Ramblings

My Two Fears

I think I have mentioned on this blog before that I have a fear of flying. Despite this, I am obsessed with the television programmes investigating air crashes. Air Crash Investigation, Aircrash Confidential – you name it and I have probably watched it. As the titles suggest, these programmes deal with investigating what causes a plane to crash and don’t really deal with the personal side of things – the deaths, the lives wasted. Maybe they act to reassure me that these crashes are very infrequent and usually happen because of a catalogue of unforeseen circumstances coming to bear at once. In any case, the mechanical failures or pilot errors that these programmes highlight, is not what I am really scared of. My real fear is…

Ramblings

The Saint Paul’s Pub

I was in Liverpool the other day searching for a main Post Office, which seems to be a rather difficult task these days. Once you discover one lurking in the shadows, it is then a case of finding somewhere to park close enough to not require the help of Sherpa Tenzing to reach it. I eventually found a place near what used to be St Paul’s Square – home of the old Liverpool Stadium, just off Old Hall Street. That is when the old memories, long ago forgotten, started flooding back…

Music

Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen is an inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. While giving the speech at Cohen’s induction in 2008, Lou Reed described him as belonging to the “highest and most influential echelon of songwriters.” A very serious man it would seem.

Having suffered from depression during much of his life, Cohen has written much about depression and suicide. Themes of political and social justice also recur in Cohen’s work while war is also an enduring theme. A very depressing man it would seem.

Music

The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald

Back in 1976, as a teenager, I used to lie in bed on Sunday nights and listen to Arthur Murphy on Radio City. I think it was between midnight and 1am he would present, as part of his show, what he called “the peaceful hour”. I would lie awake listening, dreading the start of another week in school that the morning would bring. He would play slow-tempo pop tunes and chat away with the most wonderful Irish accent that was just designed for bedtime listening. The word “mellow” would probably best describe this hour of his show.

Then one night he played a Gordon Lightfoot song called “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald”.